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The Spotless Mind

Musings of a Non-Film Reviewer. I pay, I watch, I comment.

Month

January 2016

100 (Chris Martinez, 2008)

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SPOILER ALERT!!

My notes on 100:

1. If you only had a hundred days left to live, what one hundred things would you do with your limited time? Scary thought for sure, but something that most of us had probably imagined.

2. Upon diagnosis of a terminal case of lymphoma, Joyce de Leon (played by the excellent Mylene Dizon) used Post-its on her wall to remind herself of her bucket list. The tasks ranged from serious responsibilities (resign, pay loans and mortgage), normal chores (clean closet, pack books), sentimental tasks (arrange photo album, visit high school), mundane stuff (food trips that included ice cream, Lapid’s chicharon, and crispy pata; kiss a stranger) and even chilling realities (pick a casket, select funeral clothes).

3. The list grew longer as she revealed her illness to family and friends. Her best friend Ruby (the delightful Eugene Domingo) added the typical BFF fun stuff (trip to HK) while her mother (the superb Tessie Tomas) wrote down normal motherly tasks (stop smoking, visit Manaoag). None of the items would be out of place in a usual bucket list. Even her fantasies (visit Europe, see the Eiffel Tower and Mona Lisa) were fulfilled via YouTube. Everything was so grounded in reality that it would be hard not to feel her pain and her fears.

4. I definitely loved the writing in this film. People talk like real human beings and even if it dealt with life and death, there were still a lot of moments that made me laugh (sometimes through the tears). One said scene involved an Ate Vi marathon. After viewing Tagos ng Dugo (where can I get a copy of this?) and Relasyon, the two friends decided to watch Pahiram ng Isang Umaga. Bad choice, obviously. They were bawling by the end that Ruby quipped “Sabi ko sa’yo dapat Darna na lang sinunod natin eh.”

Another included a skinny dipping scene that you would have to see to believe (such fearless actresses! Bravo!!).

5. I probably had a lump in my throat for the entire two hours. There was just an overall feeling of uneasiness and anxiety even if the scenes were nowhere close to being mawkish. I started choosing my own funeral songs as well when I saw her selection (Seasons of Love, really?! Mine would include The Scientist, for sure.)

6. I also understood why Tell Mommy was the hardest thing for her to do. In one scene, her mom served her veggie kare-kare without the tuwalya and without any bagoong since it was bad for her health. It ended with a brutal shouting match (“Pati mga libro ko pinalitan mo. The Purpose Drive Life? Aanhin ko yun?”) followed by one of the most heartbreaking scenes in the film where Joyce apologized and said “Lahat tayo mamamatay Ma. Mauuna lang po ako. Ng konti.” (Full disclosure: I was crying while typing this.)

7. Here’s a line that struck me a lot (delivered by Joyce’s boss upon her resignation): “Kayo talagang mga single, masyado kayong restless. You don’t know what to do with your money. You don’t know what to do with your lives.” Hurtful and yet so true.

8. The last few minutes were definitely up for interpretation. Others would argue that she didn’t die in the end and she was just at peace with herself. The rest would say that she died and ended up in paradise (given her fear that there was no life after death). Regardless of the actual meaning, the silence of the wonderfully-executed scene provided the catharsis that the audience (still with lumps in our throat) needed as well.

Rating: ★★★★★

THE BIG SHORT (Adam McKay, 2015)

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My notes on The Big Short:

1. The words Finance, Housing Market, and Wall Street automatically send a signal to my brain to shut down and prevent any possible aneurysm. Sure, I love the smell of money, but anything numbers-related immediately puts me to sleep. The only knowledge I have about the stock market is limited to the Hollywood Stock Exchange where you get to trade virtual movie stocks based on their box office performance. So yes, I do know how to long, short, sell, and cover stocks but an online game doesn’t even come close to the real thing.

2. I loved how this movie treated its audience like newbies (or dummies) to the industry. It took its time to explain terms needed to fully understand the financial crisis and collapse of the housing market. What better way to understand subprime loans than with the help of Margot Robbie drinking champagne in a bubble bath? Or Anthony Bourdain comparing a CDO with his three day old halibut stew? And even Selena Gomez breaking down a synthetic CDO? (I still didn’t completely understand everything but I guess that only made the movie sound smarter.) Take note, this was a comedy. A very funny one.

3. As a person with self-diagnosed ADHD, I didn’t mind the stylistic editing on speed, random images, and crazy montages. Again, numbers meant boring and my short attention span could only take so much.

4. I was surprised that Christian Bale got the sole acting nomination for this film. Don’t get me wrong, he was great as the metal music-loving, glass-eyed Michael Burry, but I thought Steve Carell was so much better as the fidgety, hot-tempered loon Mark Baum. He was loud and obnoxious and yet completely relatable. (I loved how his character as a kid studied the Talmud looking for inconsistencies in the word of God.) Definitely a better performance than in Foxcatcher.

Favorite Mark Baum line:

“I hate it here. Everyone’s walking around like they’re in a fucking Enya video!”

5. When Brad Pitt showed up as the voice of reason Ben Rickert (“If they’re right, people lose homes, jobs, retirement savings, pensions. Just don’t fucking dance”), you realize that there were no heroes in this movie. You might be rooting for these losers (if they were so smart and made money out of something that everyone else didn’t believe in, were they still?), but they were making money out of people’s future miseries.

6. How could you not love a movie where the song Saigo No Iiwaki played in the Japanese restaurant scene? Or maybe you’d know its Tagalog counterpart, Ted Ito’s Ikaw Pa Rin?

All together now…”Nais ko’y makapiling kang muli. Nais ko’y mayakap kahit sa sandali. Kung pangarap ma’y tatanggapin ko. Ikaw pa rin ang iniibig ko.”

Rating: ★★★★★

EVERYTHING ABOUT HER (Joyce Bernal, 2016)

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SPOILER ALERT!!

My notes on Everything About Her:

1. From the opening scene alone, the movie clearly established that this was The Devil Wears Louboutins with the Vilma Santos playing a bitchy career-driven boss from hell (or as one character called her “Impakta ang potah”). She wore fabulous outfits (her gorgeous red ensemble reminded me of Ate Vi during her Eskinol days, “You too can be an Eskinol girl like me!”), had her own set of Emily and Nigel, and even a variation of the “That’s all” catchphrase (“Ang bagaaaaal!!”).

2. In this movie though, Miranda Priestly had multiple myeloma and instead of getting an executive assistant, she needed a personal nurse (Angel Locsin). It reminded me so much of the superior M. Mother’s Maiden Name (with the wonderful Zsa Zsa Padilla).

3. The first half of the movie was a delight with director Joyce Bernal deftly handling the comedic scenes and the two leads displaying great comic timing. Ate Vi’s character was named Vivian Rabaya and I actually thought they would start calling her Ate Viv. Angel, on the other hand, was named Jaica Domingo (“She calls me tonta for short”). Whether it was Ate Vi throwing insults left and right or Angel dangling from the side of a cab, there were moments of pure joy that really made me laugh out loud.

My favorite throwaway joke:

Ate Vi: “Kumain ka na?”
Angel: “Opo.”
Ate Vi: “Mukha nga.”

4. When Xian Lim’s character was introduced, I slowly started to lose interest not only because Xian lacked the acting chops (his tears were falling but his eyes remained dead) to go toe-to-toe with these amazing actresses, but also because the movie forced an unnecessary love story (which we all know will have the requisite Star Cinema happy ending).

I remembered how good Luis Manzano was in In My Life. He should have been cast here instead.

5. Where can I buy a similar low-hanging chandelier? Yes, I’m gonna swing from it. Waley.

6. Wala talagang kupas si Ate Vi. When her character learned that she had cancer, she held back her tears pretending to be strong and smiled while saying “Cancer lang ‘to.” In another scene, you could actually feel her longing to embrace her son and the bittersweet feeling when he finally did while she was in severe pain. That bathroom scene reminded me so much of her performance in The Dolzura Cortez Story.

7. Speaking of her filmography, I loved the (unintentional?) homage to Pahiram ng Isang Umaga. The lines she said while wishing for more time were really powerful (“Baka kelangan ko ng cancer, kelangan ko ng deadline. Pero sana wag masyadong mabilis, kelangan ko pa ng konting panahon. Konti lang.”) And that quiet scene where Vangie Labalan placed a blanket on her shoulder really broke my heart.

8. Jaica’s a smart nurse. How could she not know that an original Birkin or Balenciaga should never be utilized for anything vomit-related?

9. Did they use the same vacant lot where Popoy and Basha were supposed to build their dream house? Ooh, this will really drive Popoy to alcoholism.

10. In one scene, Angel made a Darna reference that was so meta it made my head hurt. So let’s see, Ate Vi played Darna and she was previously married to Edu Manzano who played Captain Barbell. They had Luis Manzano who played Flash Bomba and he’s currently together (are they still?) with Angel Locsin, another Darna. Talk about a family of superheroes. #mindblown

Rating: ★★★☆☆

ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS: THE ROAD CHIP (Walt Becker, 2015)

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My notes on Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip:

1. As a kid, I have always loved the Chipmunks that I would try and imitate their voices by talking in front of an electric fan with the dial turned up to three. (Okay, sometimes I sang the theme song as well: “Alvin, Simon, Theodoooore!”) And no, I never had access to helium balloons. If I did, I wouldn’t have ended up with so much kabag.

2. This fourth film in the series wasn’t any better than the previous sequels, but it was just too hard to hate on these lovable, furry singing creatures. The jokes were completely juvenile so they mostly involved farting, peeing, and pooping. My favorite bit was when Alvin told Dave that they were very mature and then Theodore farted and said in his too cute voice, “Oops, pizza toots!” It might not be funny for anyone over eight, but us kids laughed our hearts out.

3. I wish there were more pop songs included here other than Uptown Funk and Geronimo. Sure, it was fun to hear Conga and Iko Iko but I missed the Chipettes singing Bad Romance and Single Ladies. Plus, the girls were sidelined in the entire movie playing judges in a blatant plug for American Idol.

4. Jennifer Coolidge showed up yet again in a ditzy role which was a variation of her Sophie Kaczinsky in 2 Broke Girls, in turn a variation of her Paulette in Legally Blonde, also a variation of her MILF role in American Pie. Has she played any other character of late?

5. Actually, a lot of good actors (mostly Emmy winners) showed up to cash in their checks. Tony Hale endured a lot of slapstick jokes from various animals that will put his encounters with VP Selina Meyer to shame. Uzo Aduba had a thankless role as a security officer that simply wanted to frisk passengers. Even John Waters showed up for a brief cameo (thankfully, no poop-eating scene).

6. I wouldn’t be spoiling anything if I say that Dave ended up adopting the Chipmunks, thereby one-upping the Brangelina clan. As one character stated, “Families come in all shapes and sizes. We don’t judge.” Aww, now wasn’t that nice?

Rating: ★★☆☆☆

MACBETH (Justin Kurzel, 2015)

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My notes on Macbeth:

1. The opening scene with the dead Macbaby perfectly set the somber tone of this adaptation. I can barely remember reading the source (maybe I even just read the Cliff’s Notes version) but I don’t recall an actual baby in the play. I even thought that Lady Macbeth went mad from her frustration of not having (not loss of) a baby and all the references on sucking milk were just imaginary (side note: I suddenly remembered a local actress that also experienced the same thing and she apparently took care of a doll while on the set. Sadness.)

Now that I have a lot of time to read, I need to catch up on these classics.

2. There were only a few of us in the theater and some understandably walked out halfway through. The movie was a test of patience with its leisurely pacing, extra slow motion battle sequences, Old English dialogue, and constant monologues. But then again, anybody watching a Shakespeare adaptation should have been prepared for that. (Good news: there were English subtitles so I didn’t get an epistaxis trying to figure out what the characters were saying, e.g. “Bid me not speak, see, speak yourselves” for “Kayo na ang sumight sa bangkay”).

3. I loved the visuals in the movie, especially the final battle scene with the red and orange hues. I would have to admit that I snickered a bit though when Michael Fassbender’s eyeshadow and mascara got smudged from the constant crying (and also in the scene where Macduff called his kids “all my pretty chickens”).

4. Speaking of Fassy, he was fine as the said “Warrior King” but was still no match for Marion Cotillard’s deranged performance. As the scheming Lady Macbeth, you could actually see her devilish smile even in the dark after her husband said that he had done the murderous deed. Her delivery of the line “A little water clears us of this deed” was just chilling that when she showed human emotions during the latter part of the movie (“Out, damned spot!”), one couldn’t help but doubt if they were crocodile tears.

5. I stand by my belief that Lady Macbeth was somewhat misunderstood. Was she really innately evil or just a completely supportive wife? Did the lack of a child diminish her maternal instincts or made her more selfless and loving? Why do strong and ambitious women always end up getting a bad rap? I digress.

Rating: ★★★☆☆

THE 5TH WAVE (J Blakeson, 2016)

 

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SPOILER ALERT!!

My notes on The 5th Wave:

1. Why are aliens always portrayed as dimwits in alien invasion movies? For a supposedly more advanced species that can create a now identified flying object, they don’t seem to have any good battle strategy and always lose in the end. I guess they have never played Clash of Clans.

In this one, their idea of going into war was a 5-step plan that included an electro-magnetic pulse, tsunamis, mutated bird flu, humans against humans, and basically training an army of kids to work for them. It took months of hovering over the planet to see their brilliant idea self-destruct because they forgot the strongest weapon of all: LOVE.

Cue maniacal laughter.

2. The movie started off fine with our plucky heroine (aren’t they all?) basically narrating all the events ever since the invasion started. It felt like the usual apocalypse survival movie (planes crashing from the skies, huge waves wiping out Thailand, pestilence spreading everywhere) and it was engaging and interesting. But then the movie got sidetracked by a developing love story (and you know that since this was based on a young adult novel, it would be a love triangle) that didn’t serve much purpose except to show a topless tampisaw sa batis scene with our lucky (I mean, lovely) heroine ogling her eyes out.

3. There was also a huge chunk of filler scenes involving a Quantico-style training school with the hopes that this movie would merit a sequel (uhh, I don’t think so).

4. I loved the school’s dedication to continue holding classes even with a huge UFO floating above the building. This should be a lesson for all kids (and parents) eagerly awaiting the announcement on cancellation of classes as soon as it starts drizzling. I remember as a kid waking up at 4am just to listen to the news on the radio. The words “Signal Number 3 in Metro Manila” made me feel like it was Christmas in July.

5. Crocs (yup, the awesome-looking footwear) are very much like cockroaches that can survive a nuclear explosion. Don’t forget to stock up in time for the next end of the world prophesy.

6. I really felt bad for the good actors trapped in this inferior movie. Liev Schreiber didn’t do much except bark orders, Maria Bello was made to look like a rotting corpse, Ron Livingston was tasked to keep making his eyes look big, and of course the talented Chloe Grace Moretz was given a scene where she searches a bag screaming “Where’s my gun? Where’s my gun??” just in case the audience was too dense to know that she was looking for her gun. (FYI, she also had a slow motion run in the woods because, well, the director wanted a slow motion sequence.)

7. I couldn’t believe that this was written by Akiva Goldsman and Susannah Grant (the same people behind A Beautiful Mind and Erin Brockovich). Can someone check if there are alien bugs controlling their brains?

8. “Love’s not a trick, it’s real. I know now because of you.” I suddenly wished that I was one of those people killed by the bird flu.

Rating: ★★☆☆☆

OUR BRAND IS CRISIS (David Gordon Green, 2015

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My notes on Our Brand Is Crisis:

1. From the very start, Sandra Bullock’s character Jane Bodine set the tone of the movie by saying things like “I could convince myself anything…at a price” or “Truth is relative”. Also called “Calamity Jane” by her peers, she was a political consultant/strategist (think a less-fashionable Olivia Pope in a scruffy beige jacket) tasked to clean up the image and campaign of a Bolivian presidential candidate. This movie couldn’t have been any timelier given our country’s current political climate.

2. A lot of the things that were shown here should be familiar to our nation (or any nation for that matter) during election season: a deluge of idiotic political ads with crappy jingles, smear campaigns aimed to generate disgust or fear at an opposing candidate, politicians carrying babies or singing in general assemblies, candidates crying in interviews to generate sympathy from voters. Basically every trick in the campaign book was covered and although these weren’t new to anybody, the scenes were still depressingly hilarious because of its authenticity (fake tears and all).

3. One really funny scene showed the group shooting a lame commercial involving a llama. It ran out of the building and got hit by a car prompting Sandra to say “He’d rather kill himself than be in our commercial.”

4. Politics is a joke in itself so I couldn’t really understand why the movie had to resort to groan-worthy slapstick for laughs. Sandra may be a pro with that brand of comedy but seeing her fall from a broken chair, constantly throw up, moon people, and have trouble closing a van’s window was completely unnecessary. The elastic bra prank didn’t really add anything to the story.

5. Joachim de Almeida who played the Bolivian candidate they were saving looked so much like Eddie Garcia. Look him up.

Also, a lot of the viewers kept saying that he was eerily similar to Mayor Rodrigo Duterte (lagging in current polls, has temper issues, etc.). Duterte’s supporters (Duterters?), there is still hope. You know who to call.

6. The endless quotes uttered in the movie from Sun Tzu to Warren Beatty to Muhammad Ali reminded me so much of Tito Boy Abunda. He would be the type of host that would blurt out things like “Friedrich Nietzsche said, ‘If you fight monsters for too long, you become one'” while asking Angelica Panganiban to confirm her breakup with John Lloyd Cruz.

7. Speaking of quotes, one scene involved a rival campaign manager not doing a fact check before feeding a (mis)quote to his candidate. I guess he wasn’t too smart after all.

8. The Cult of the Cosmic Wind sounded like a group that converged inside my stomach after eating at Mexicali.

9. During the presidential debate, a candidate was asked a tough question about constitutional reform for indigenous people of Bolivia. I was so happy that nobody replied “PILLS!!”, although that would have made a funnier movie.

10. Why do characters always have to grow a conscience in the end? To quote Tito Boy quoting George R.R. Martin, “A good act does not wash out the bad, nor a bad act the good. Each should have its own reward.”

Rating: ★★★☆☆

LUMAYO KA NGA SA AKIN (Mark Meily, Andoy Ranay, Chris Martinez, 2016)

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My notes on Lumayo Ka Nga Sa Akin:

1. We usually see local parodies on gag shows like Bubble Gang or Banana Split, and on every Wenn Deramas movie so this one didn’t really have anything new to offer. It aimed to mock Philippine cinema tropes and the local moviegoing audience but didn’t tell us more than what we already knew.

2. My biggest problem with this movie was that it bordered on being mean-spirited. Several references were made on the Pinoy audience basically being stupid for loving the same old cliches in different genres (action, horror, and romance) and that anything outside of the norm would be an immediate flop. Sure, some of these observations may be factual but I still think that we’re much better than that. Was it really the audience’s fault if they enjoyed a good old formulaic movie? Weren’t the studios/producers to blame as well for churning out the same profit-driven product? Maybe this was an even bigger problem than the movie actually presented.

3. These were some of the lines that were supposed to be funny (wink, wink) but made me cringe a bit:

“Kelangan mo ikwento ang nangyayari sa audience kasi karamihan naman dyan…(wink)…” (I’m guessing they were going for tanga? Or in Cathy Garcia-Molina verse TANGA!!)

“Sabihan ang writer para di langawin. Ayaw ng audience ng bagong idea.”

“Hindi masyadong nakakaunawa ng English ang audience natin.”

Did the movie really think that it was smarter than its audience? And was this really specific to just the Pinoy audience?

4. On the flipside, did these observations hurt because they were true? Don’t we really love action films where people get killed in a wedding and it suddenly becomes a revenge flick? Don’t we enjoy the endless banter between the bida and kontrabida before the final shootout? Or the requisite sampalan scene during a tension-filled showdown between two women?

5. Very much like its poster, the movie was trying to be Scary Movie (1 to Sawa) except that it provided a broad look at Philippine Cinema instead of recreating scenes from specific movies. Funny enough, the episodic treatment was very similar to some of the movies it was trying to make fun of (Mga Kwento ni Lola Basyang, Stupid Cupid, Tatlong Mukha ng Pag-ibig, please tell me you know them as well hehe).

6. The first episode by Mark Meily didn’t have a lot of new things to say about Pinoy action films. I did like the John Regala Kontrabida Instructional Video but everything else was just meh. To be fair, I laughed a bit when Candy Pangilinan said “Pwede bang Face of the Night na lang kasi walang kwenta na ang Best Actress ngayon?”

7. The second episode was a horror send-up of Shake, Rattle, and Roll (if you watched the three movies I mentioned above, all of them had their horror episodes as the middle one). Maricel Soriano’s love-it-or-hate-it performance was reminiscent of her acting in 90’s action-comedy movies with Cesar Montano, Bong Revilla, and Lito Lapid, among others, down to her usual adlib of “Pigilan mo ako naniningkit na ang mga mata ko!”) It was shrill and hyper and your enjoyment will depend on your tolerance for that brand of comedy (everyone knows how much I love her so you know where I stand). The rest of the jokes (the botched subtitles, night time exorcism, Bollywood production number, etc.) were okay at best.

8. I really liked Shy Carlos here. I wasn’t a fan of her performances in Para Sa Hopeless Romantic and Chain Mail but she really stood out here just for being the bitchy voice of the people (Maricel to Shy: “Minsan lang ‘to gumawa ng movie nagkaganyan na.” Haha!)

9. The best among the three episodes was definitely Chris Martinez’s Asawa ni Marie because it was just really funny. I rarely enjoy Cristine Reyes’ performance but she was so game here down to bobbing assorted items from the putikan (“Wala pong putikan saan nyo ako ilulublob?”). I instantly liked her as soon as she started prancing on the seashore (ala Marimar) along with her lifesize dog/mascot Yagit and letting out a typical hagikgik.

10. The rest of the cast were good as well (Jayson Gainza as the dashing leading man, Jackie Lou Blanco as the matapobre haciendera, etc.) but it was Joey Paras who stood out as the submissive mother (yes, mother!) of Marie. From the moment he said “Senyorita, nagbalik po ba kayo para sabunutan ako ng walang dahilan?” up to the scene where he carried said senyorita back to the mansion, I was out of breath from laughing that I had to use my inhaler.

11. Did they use the same room that stood in as the US condo of Clark and Leah on On The Wings of Love?

12. Out of all the self-awareness present in the movie, the best line had to be in that scene where Cristine kept hawking faux products, “Pelikula na, patalastas pa? Tama, wala tayong delikadeza.” Now that’s one masigabong palakpakan na sampal sa industriya.

Ratings:

BALA SA BALA, KAMAO SA KAMAO, SATSAT SA SATSAT (Mark Meily) – ★★☆☆☆

SHAKE, SHAKER, SHAKEST (Andoy Ranay) – ★★☆☆☆

ASAWA NI MARIE (Chris Martinez) – ★★★★☆

SNOOPY AND CHARLIE BROWN: THE PEANUTS MOVIE (Steve Martino, 2015)

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My notes on Snoopy and Charlie Brown: The Peanuts Movie:

1. I wasn’t the biggest fan of the Peanuts comic strip only because I was more of a Baltic & Co. person (age alert!!). I did enjoy their holiday specials and I learned a lot about the human body because of them. When I was around seven, my mom got me this book where the Peanuts gang discussed the difference between the femur and the tibia and the anvil and the stirrup. My favorite part was Snoopy cracking a joke about the funny bone. Good times!

2. Sometimes I still wonder if the phrase “go fly a kite” was because of Benjamin Franklin or actually from Charlie Brown (or neither?).

3. The thing that I really liked about the movie was that it easily captured the charm and sweetness of the cartoon. Although it had a cast of kids, there were so many funny insights (“A comic book? I thought classics need to have hardcovers?”) and grown-up stuff mixed in with the silly gags. Where else can you hear a kid ruminate on self-esteem (and basically life in general) with the line “I came down with a serious case of inadequacies”?

4. I immediately loved the new girl because she nibbled on her pencil. I chewed on mine a lot back in grade school and I could still remember the taste of wood up to now. I always capped it off with a bite on the rubber eraser as well.

5. Who could ever forget the feeling of having a first crush? Although I had always been Lucy (which I’ll explain in a bit), I was still rooting for Charlie Brown all the way. I had my first crush back in third (?) grade and she was a Sophomore that I sat next to in our school bus (more like a van, really). Since we were not in a European film, you know that our love story was doomed from the start.

6. Although the animation in the fantasy scenes with Snoopy and Fifi was really good, I saw it more as a distraction (and part filler) to the main story. I wasn’t surprised that the two Korean girls next to me were sleeping soundly during those bits.

7. As I stated earlier, I was definitely Lucy (not short for Lucifer, I hope). She was mean, crabby, and opinionated, but when needed the most, had a pure heart. Story of my life, the universe rather, right there.

8. Don’t we all have that one dugyot friend in a barkada? The inner OC in me wanted to give Pigpen a bath. And speaking of friends, we all need a Snoopy in our life. I really liked the scene where Charlie Brown accidentally triggered the sprinkler system and Snoopy opened an umbrella for him to which he sadly replied, “Thanks buddy!”. *sniff*

9. I still couldn’t believe that Charlie Brown was able to finish War and Peace (or Leo’s Toy Store by Warren Peace) in a day. I always fall asleep after a few pages. I really need to read that one again.

10. That wah wah wah garbled words when the adults talked was genius. Older people will always sound different to us.

11. Haters can hate but I loved all of Meghan Trainor’s songs in this movie.

12. “Do they like me for who I am or who they think I am?” Is this really a kids’ movie? Good grief!

Rating: ★★★☆☆

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